Vitamin B crucial to children’s mental health

 

A new study led by the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research has uncovered a significant link between vitamin B levels and the mental health and wellbeing of children and adolescents. The research, published in the international journal Preventive Medicine, indicated that children with a diet low in B-vitamins were more likely to experience mental health and behavioural problems than those with a healthier diet rich in B-vitamins.

Researcher Carly Herbison said the study is the first to report on a direct link between the prevalence of externalising behaviour problems in adolescents at 17 years and a reduced intake of B1, B2, B5, B6 and folate. "B-vitamins are essential for the production of neurotransmitters, like serotonin, which modulates behaviour in humans and can contribute to feelings of well-being and happiness," she said.

"Previous studies have shown that externalising mental health and behaviour problems developed during adolescence are related to a higher risk of offending and substance abuse later in life," said Ms Herbison. "What this study looked at was the relationship between diet, specifically B-vitamin intake and the presence of these externalising behaviours." 

Report senior author Professor Wendy Oddy, who heads the Institute's nutritional research, said the study reinforces how a healthy diet can play a key role in improving mental health outcomes for young people. "There is a great message in this in how diet may help prevent mental health problems. Improving what our children eat and ensuring they are getting essential B-vitamins from foods such as nuts, seeds, whole-grains, legumes and fruit and vegetables can have a really positive impact on their mental health and wellbeing," Professor Oddy said. 

The research was funded by the Cardiovascular Disease and Depression Strategic Research Program, a partnership between the Heart Foundation and beyondblue: the national depression and anxiety initiative. 

The study used detailed nutritional and mental health data collected from participants in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort, Raine Study. The Telethon Institute study has recommended further research into the link between B-Vitamins and adolescent mental health and wellbeing. 

Herbison, C.E. et al.:  Low intake of B-vitamins is associated with poor adolescent mental health and behaviour, Prev.Med 55(6), December 2012, 634–638

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.09.014

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Health

International Network of Integrative Mental Health

 

The first network of its kind endorsing an integrative approach to the treatment of mental health has been launched as part of World Mental Health Week.

The International Network of Integrative Mental Health (INIMH) is a network of mental health experts including medical doctors, allied health clinicians, and academics who are passionate about improving mental health outcomes for patients by combining complementary and mainstream medicine.

Vice Chair of INIMH and NHMRC Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jerome Sarris said the network would be a resource to doctors, researchers and the general public on the practice of integrated mental health care.  

“There is a growing body of statistical and anecdotal evidence indicating that many people are using non-conventional approaches (often in combination with mainstream medicine) to treat mental health conditions,” he said.

 “Despite this, there has been a deficit in the availability of high-quality information for people to improve their mental health using an integrated approach that combines the ‘best of both worlds’. 

“INIMH would address the absence of quality, evidence-based information about integrative and complementary medicine approaches in current mental healthcare,” he said.

The practice of “integrative mental healthcare” adopts a model of healthcare that uses an integrated approach to addressing biological, psychological, and sociological determinants of mental illness. 

A combination of mainstream interventions such as pharmacological treatments and psychosocial interventions with evidence-based non-conventional therapeutics (such as nutritional medicine, dietary and exercise modification, acupuncture, select herbal medicines, and mindfulness meditation), are often prescribed.

The INIMH announcement incorporates the official launch of its innovative website for clinicians and the public. The interactive website provides links to resources on integrative mental healthcare; expert-hosted forums; a comprehensive searchable mental healthcare library; and offers networking between clinicians, researchers and the public.

Dr Sarris has also recently co-authored a White Paper outlining strategic recommendations for advancing integrative mental healthcare, including increasing research in key areas, improving clinician training and education, and promoting a public health agenda. 

“The current trend suggests that many healthcare providers and patients believe that both conventional and non-conventional therapies are legitimate treatment choices,” Dr Sarris pointed out.  “However there is little agreement on what healthcare providers should recommend — or patients should choose — regarding safe, evidence-based, non-conventional or integrative treatment strategies to address mental health needs. INIMH addresses this deficit.”

 “It is our intention with the launch of INIMH and the website now to grow the international network to assist in the transformation of mental healthcare, and to provide a vital resource for clinicians and the public.”

The INIMH website is at   www.inimh.org

The first issue of the INIMH Newsletter dated September 2012 contains a review of Dr William Walsh’s recently published book NUTRIENT POWER –Heal your Biochemistry and Heal your Brain by Dr Judith E. Pentz, an INIMH Board member.

 

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Book Review of Nutrient Power by Dr Judith Pentz International Network Integrative Mental Health Board Member

Book Review by Judith E. Pentz, MD (Board Member of INIMH)

NUTRIENT POWER: HEAL YOUR BIOCHEMISTRY AND HEAL YOUR BRAIN by William Walsh PhD  (Skyhorse Publishing, 2012)

NUTRIENT POWER is a synthesis of the science/research that was started by Abram Hoffer and Carl Pfeiffer. The book is a synopsis of William Walsh’s life work that led to the formation of the Pfeiffer Clinic located near Chicago. The clinic recently closed their doors but the legacy and the research that it generated are finally being shared with clinicians and the public. There are different laboratories around the world offering the testing described in the book, with the largest concentration here and in Australia. 

The collaboration with different researchers, including Carl Pfeiffer and Dr Walsh’s colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory, started with Dr Walsh being curious as to why there was such high recidivism in the prisons where he volunteered. He spent time with the families and noticed a pattern of one person from the family being ‘different’ from early on, compared to siblings that were more able to be part of an ordinary, non-criminal life. He decided to study their blood and urine samples as well as other lab studies. This led to small pilot studies as well as field studies with a blinded aspect to them. There were 12 outcome studies done. An open label study was done in 2004. The clinic found that the earlier the intervention (< 14y.o.) the better the outcome, so their focus switched to children and teens in 1985.

The patterns he saw were also seen by Abram Hoffer and Carl Pfeiffer. Notably, the interventions they proposed were correct but the hypotheses they put forth were inaccurate. With the help of basic biochemistry and epigenetics, there is an interesting convergence happening that may assist us in understanding patterns of behavioral/emotional challenges across all diagnostic categories in the DSM.

The awareness of environment, lifestyle, diet, and toxins having adverse impact on gene expression is growing. There is increased research noting that micronutrients may play a role. Nutrient overload is seen ‘to create more havoc on mental state’ than nutrient deficiency. The research has found that specific nutrient interventions can assist in creating balance in the blood and urine. The end results lead to: optimizing concentration of nutrients needed for neurotransmitter synthesis, epigenetic regulation of neurotransmitter activity, reduced oxidative stress. 

One main biochemical pathway that is often adversely affected is the methylation cycle with undermethyl-ation and overmethylation being great contributors to mental illness, depending on the variables of nature and nurture. The strength of the expression of the defect varies for each individual with the defect. 

DNA and histones involve a winding and unwinding process, via adding either a methyl group or acetyl group. Methylation tends to put the brakes on the process and acetylation speeds up the process. 

The use of nutrients and modifying oxidative stress impacts this process on the number of transporters at the cell membrane. The transporters aid in the passage of neurotransmitters across the cell membrane.

A discovery in 2009 aided in understanding some of the puzzling findings. The methyl (CH3) group and folic acid ratio have an inverse relationship from an epigenetic point of view on norepinephrine. Folates tend to enhance histone demethylation. Methionine increases histone methylation. With this information, more specific nutrient interventions were possible. 

This may also help us to better understand why certain people with depression who are overmethylated respond poorly to SSRIs but those who are undermethylated respond nicely to SSRIs.

Other specific interventions address what are referred to as biotypes: 

  • copper overload with zinc deficiency; 
  • vitamin B6 deficiency; 
  • Zinc deficiency due to dietary issues; 
  • amino acid imbalances; 
  • fatty acid imbalances; 
  • oxidative stress; 
  • toxic overload; 
  • glucose dysregulation; and 
  • malabsorption.

The details of various studies that were conducted during the 20 years are reviewed. The response time depended on the type of imbalance with the challenge of pyrrole overload being the easiest and quickest to remedy. Positive impact can be seen in days. There is also a breakdown by disorder with the specific biotypes that are noted above.

Schizophrenia is a focus, with two expanded views/hypotheses: glutamate theory, with a discussion of the role of NMDA being modified with glycine, noting that the NMDA receptor has the unique role of simultaneous docking of glutamate and glycine. The second theory has to do with oxidative stress being a primary cause of the disorder. He notes that, with the reduction of glutathione, this allows for reduced glutamate. This leads to delusions and hallucinations.

Time is spent reviewing the strengths and the challenges of the nutrient interventions. Looking at non-responders, the majority were due to noncompliance with the protocols. Other setbacks were growth spurts, injuries, illness, emotional stress, Type A blood and malabsorption. Substance abuse, anoxia at birth, and head injuries would lead to poor outcomes. The only exception with substance abuse was if the person was using marijuana, they would still respond.

He is hopeful that the field of epigenetics  will further the future of nutrient therapies rather than ‘introducing more foreign molecules to the brain’.

It is a promising approach that is summarized relatively well. There is a level of repetition that can be a bit tedious but it drives home the point that there is a pattern present and yet there are very different expressions that occur at the physical/mental/emotional level. Interestingly, the nutrient therapies are still specific to the biotype, regardless of the DSM diagnosis. Further research to replicate this body of research would be good to consider but should not deter the clinician from considering exploring this nutrient intervention in a clinical setting.

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Books

International Network of Integrative Mental Health

The first network of its kind endorsing an integrative approach to the treatment of mental health has been launched as part of World Mental Health Week.

The International Network of Integrative Mental Health (INIMH) is a network of mental health experts including medical doctors, allied health clinicians, and academics who are passionate about improving mental health outcomes for patients by combining complementary and mainstream medicine.

Vice Chair of INIMH and NHMRC Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jerome Sarris said the network would be a resource to doctors, researchers and the general public on the practice of integrated mental health care.  

“There is a growing body of statistical and anecdotal evidence indicating that many people are using non-conventional approaches (often in combination with mainstream medicine) to treat mental health conditions,” he said.

 “Despite this, there has been a deficit in the availability of high-quality information for people to improve their mental health using an integrated approach that combines the ‘best of both worlds’. 

“INIMH would address the absence of quality, evidence-based information about integrative and complementary medicine approaches in current mental healthcare,” he said.

The practice of “integrative mental healthcare” adopts a model of healthcare that uses an integrated approach to addressing biological, psychological, and sociological determinants of mental illness. 

A combination of mainstream interventions such as pharmacological treatments and psychosocial interventions with evidence-based non-conventional therapeutics (such as nutritional medicine, dietary and exercise modification, acupuncture, select herbal medicines, and mindfulness meditation), are often prescribed.

The INIMH announcement incorporates the official launch of its innovative website for clinicians and the public. The interactive website provides links to resources on integrative mental healthcare; expert-hosted forums; a comprehensive searchable mental healthcare library; and offers networking between clinicians, researchers and the public.

Dr Sarris has also recently co-authored a White Paper outlining strategic recommendations for advancing integrative mental healthcare, including increasing research in key areas, improving clinician training and education, and promoting a public health agenda. 

“The current trend suggests that many healthcare providers and patients believe that both conventional and non-conventional therapies are legitimate treatment choices,” Dr Sarris pointed out.  “However there is little agreement on what healthcare providers should recommend — or patients should choose — regarding safe, evidence-based, non-conventional or integrative treatment strategies to address mental health needs. INIMH addresses this deficit.”

 “It is our intention with the launch of INIMH and the website now to grow the international network to assist in the transformation of mental healthcare, and to provide a vital resource for clinicians and the public.”

The INIMH website is at   www.inimh.org

The first issue of the INIMH Newsletter dated September 2012 contains a review of Dr William Walsh’s recently published book NUTRIENT POWER –Heal your Biochemistry and Heal your Brain by Dr Judith E. Pentz, an INIMH Board member.

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From The President January 2013

All the team at Bio-Balance wish you a Healthy and Happy New Year. We are looking forward to our 10th Anniversary Outreach – details above.  The Outrigger Resort is large, roomy and close to the beach. We could seat at least 350 people at the Conference and there is plenty of space for stalls.  We hope our members will encourage family and friends to come along to see and hear these world-class speakers.   

We have turned to social media to help spread the word and we have a Facebook page, Twitter and a Blog page.   It has been encouraging to hear that some Medical schools are starting to introduce Integrative Medicine for their students and we welcome the news of the formation of the International Network of Integrative Mental Health (see Newsletter article)

We are delighted at the number of doctors who have already signed up to do the training in 2013 and will easily pass the 100 trained doctors in Australia after this Outreach

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General

Mental Illness or Methylation Mutation

Mental Illness Or Methylation Mutation? by Michael McEvoy 26/08/2012 7:22pm | 10 comments photo: smokedsalmon Suppose you walked into your doctor's office and he told you: "you look like you have cancer. We need to be put you on chemotherapy medications immediately." "What? How are you so sure, did you run any tests?", you ask. "No" replies the doctor, "you just look like you have cancer". As insane as this situation appears, this is an example of how a diagnosis is made in conventional psychiatry. Despite the enormous amount of psychiatric medications prescribed annually, almost all diagnoses is made solely on a behavioral basis. No physiological testing is conducted, no neurotransmitter analysis, no blood, no urine analysis, no biochemical analysis. Zero. And despite this radical departure from scientific inquiry, psychiatrists are legally allowed to prescribe brain altering chemicals, most of which change how the brain functions and creates dangerous chemical dependency. More frightening is that psychiatrists may not be sure of what psychiatric medications are actually doing in the brain and body, let alone what the combined effect of multiple medications may be. As of 2011, an estimated 1 in 10 Americans were taking anti-depressant medications. Studies indicate that antidepressant medications double the risk of suicidal behavior in young adults. Many types of psychotropic drugs are linked to violent behavior, and it has been well known that many mass murderers were taking SSRI medications. 22% of Americans suffer from a so called "mental disorder" of some kind. This can include: depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, anxiety, as well as "behavioral disorders" such as attention deficit and OCD. There are now other ambiguous mental disorder labels such as "borderline personality disorder." Again, none of these disorders are diagnosed through any scientific, biochemical means. They are diagnosed through subjective, behavioral symptoms alone. The US government has invested one trillion dollars in the "war on drugs" since the early 1970's. And yet the most chemically and physically addictive, (not to mention most profitable drugs) are available legally by psychiatrists. And one needs no biochemical testing done to be prescribed these drugs. Groundbreaking Research That Will Change Mental & Behavioral Health Epigenetics is the study of how the environment influences gene expression. Environment can be anything from diet, nutrient deficiencies, toxicity and the impact of physical trauma and stress on the how your genes are expressed. In recent years, there have been emerging studies that definitively link epigenetic changes in gene expression with schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder. This means that your genes do not rule you, as much as your diet, lifestyle, toxicity-related factors and stress may rule how your genes express mental illness (as well as huge groups of other disease processes). HYPERLINK "http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21128323.400-epigenetic-clue-to-schizophrenia-and-bipolar-disorder.html"One study in particular was conducted on 22 pairs of identical twins. Identical twins have identical DNA. However one twin among each pair expressed bi-polar or schizophrenia, and the other did not. Researchers investigated why this was the case, despite having identical DNA. In the mentally ill twin, researchers found significant changes in how certain genes were methylated. In some cases, there were significant over and undermethylation of certain genes that were present, due to epigenetic altercations. This means that some type of environmental influence is responsible for causing mental illness in these identical twins. Methylation Methylation is a chemical process that occurs in every cell of the body. Methylation is essential for many critical functions such as DNA and RNA synthesis and expression, glutathione conjugation and synthesis, synthesis of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, GABA. Proper methylation is also essential for immune regulation, including viral inhibition. The implications with improper methylation is now being seen as causative triggers in several groups of disease processes, such as neurological inflammatory diseases like HYPERLINK "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12200190"parkinson's, HYPERLINK "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19117641"alzheimer's and HYPERLINK "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20375269"autism. Autoimmune diseases such as HYPERLINK "http://www.discoverymedicine.com/Amy-M-Burrell/2011/03/09/epigenetic-mechanisms-in-multiple-sclerosis/"MS (multiple sclerosis) HYPERLINK "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17893979"lupus, and HYPERLINK "http://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2012-07-03-epigenetics-alters-rheumatoid-arthritis-genes.aspx"RA (rheumatoid arthritis) are strongly associated with epigenetic methylation mutations. For nearly 30 years, it has been known that cancer involves over and undermethylation. Mental Illness: Abnormal Methylation Has Been Seen For Decades Prior to all of the recent discoveries with methylation, genetics and epigenetics, researchers have known for decades that mental illness invovled, or was caused by problems in methylation and the "one carbon cycles". Many of these researchers were, and still are reversing the symptoms of mental illness by providing the missing nutrient substrates in methylation cycles. For decades a number of pioneering researchers have been studying the biochemical activity in mental illness. The early work of Abram Hoffer, MD, PhD provided the essential framework for the role of nutrients in brain biochemistry. Nutrients after all are the primary biochemical substrates for all biochemical activity, including neurotransmitter synthesis. The research and work of Carl Pfeiffer, MD, PhD led to innovative and very effective nutrient therapies for mental illness. Two of Pfeiffer's significant contributions were identifying the role of pyrrole disorder and copper toxicity in certain mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Dr. Pfeiffer compiled a database of more than 20,000 schizophrenics and was the first to categorize the mental illness in terms of individual "biotypes". Over his extensive career, William Walsh, PhD conducted research on more than 30,000 patients of mental health and behavioral disorders and conducted several million biochemical tests. Dr. Walsh has expanded upon the earlier work of Pfeiffer and Hoffer, and has launched the biochemistry of mental illness into new arenas, thanks in part to recent discoveries and advances in genetics and epigenetics. Dr. Walsh has documented that the urine and blood chemistry of mentally ill patient populations are strikingly different than non-mentally ill subjects. Furthermore, he has identified a number of biochemical imbalances in various mental illnesses and behavioral disabilities. Amy Yasko, PhD has been leading the charge in autism research, nutrigenomics and methylation for many years. Her pioneering work has led to the development of highly integrative and individualized nutritional therapies for autism spectrum, as well as for diseases involving neurological inflammation. Tying It All Together: Nutrient Power & Nutrigenomics There now exists ways to bypass specific gene mutations by supplying missing nutrient substrates, thereby restoring function to entire biochemical pathways. These include the biochemical pathways responsible for neurotransmitter synthesis. Biochemically speaking, the human body creates what it needs from nutrients and nutrient substrates in biochemical pathways. Without question, gene mutations caused by epigenetic factors (nutrient deficiencies, various toxicities, varying stressors) are now being recognized as primary factors in many disease processes, including mental illness. These gene mutations prevent certain nutrient substrates from being produced (or in some cases over-produced) in biochemical pathways such as in methylation, but also in pathways such as transsulfuration and acetylation. The study of how specific nutrients and nutrient substrates can be used to bypass mutated genes is called "nutrigenomics". The current and emerging science and clinical application of nutrigenomics, involves supplementing with missing biochemical nutrient substrates, as well as compensating for excesses of certain substrates. This is the future of medicine, and the future is already happening. Lives are being transformed. Clinical evidence of this is apparent in Dr. Yasko's work, as well as in the extensive work and research of Dr's Walsh and Pfeiffer over several decades. The emerging science of epigenetics is validating their work of previous decades, and is exapnding upon it rapidly, with new emerging discoveries. It is quite clear that extensive research into mental and behavioral health needs to move in the direction of DNA methylation, epigenetics, and gene-specific nutrient therapy. Will it? The profession of psychiatry has a choice of either adhering to the dogma of its widespread use of psychotropic medications, or it can acknowledge the emerging science of gene-specific nutrient therapy, epigenetics and nutrigenomics as being the safer, more scientific and more effective modality, not to mention less expensive. If psychiatry is to side with the former, then its adherence to dogmatism may be viewed in concert with its financial incentives. However, its choice to side with the latter, would allow the restoration of mental health to millions of people. Michael McEvoy has a private nutritional consulting practice. He works with clients nationally and internationally. Please HYPERLINK "http://metabolichealing.com/contact/"contact him to learn more about his nutritional consulting services and programs. Sources: C Sugden (2006). One-Carbon Metabolism in Psychiatric Illness. Nutrition Research Reviews, 19, pp 117-136 doi: 10.1079/NRR2006119 J Smythies (2012) The Role of Abnormalities Related to the One Carbon Cycle in Depression & Schizophrenia, Neuroscience & Medicine, 2012, 3, 101-106 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6329330 http://hmg.oxfordjournals.org/content/20/24/4786 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22426120?dopt=AbstractPlus http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17893979 http://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2012-07-03-epigenetics-alters-rheumatoid-arthritis-genes.aspx http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12200190 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19117641 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20375269 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/80/6/1611.abstract Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry & Heal Your Brain, W. Walsh, PhD, 2012 Mental & Elemental Nutrients, C. Pfeiffer, PhD, MD, 1975

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Nutrient Power by William J Walsh PhD

“Nutrient Power”.
By Dr. Bill Walsh
Published by Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
Available through Bio Balance Health

Just released this year, ‘Nutrient Power’ is a terrific read if you want to understand what makes a person tick – why they do the oddest things. He focuses on behaviour disorders - and their relationship to body chemistry. He looks at the mind-body connection – particularly regard to mental disorders.

He carefully takes you through each mental disorder -  depression, ADHA, Schizophrenia, autism, and anxiety - dedicating an entire chapter to each one. For example did you know there are five different types of depression? Each type has its own chemistry and therefore needs its own specific nutrient supplementation. The good news is that his nutrient therapy can be administered at the same time as the anti-depressants – often with these medications being lowered and in many cases stopped altogether.

Dr Walsh then discusses his research on Alzheimer ‘s disease – and the chemistry behind it – and how there could be an answer for those people afflicted by it. Plus he looks at the field of epigenetics – how our genes are turned on and off – and how this can affect our vital organs like our brain, heart, skin etc. He postulates that the environment – either in utero or later in life can over-ride our genetic imprint and how that can lead to the various mental disorders and many diseases. Epigenetics is gaining popularity in medical research fields – but Dr. Walsh’s book gives an in depth discussion on the latest hot topic in science.

Although he has written the book for ‘doctors, medical researchers, and families afflicted by these diseases’ – and as such is scientifically based – it is a fascinating look at the science behind the mind- body connection. The basic premise is that if a person’s body chemistry is imbalanced, this can have a pronounced impact on what neurotransmitters their brain makes. These neurotransmitters dictate our behavioural patterns. Dr, Walsh shows how such simple things like a zinc or copper imbalance can cause post natal depression – for example. Altering these levels can cure such an affliction – even over-ride the genetic code or environmental toxins that causes the condition. Similarly there are three different biotypes for Schizophrenia, and numerous ADHD conditions. These are presented with case histories and the individualized nutrient therapies that have heped literally thousands of patients recover. In fact Dr Walsh has treated over 10,000 patients and trained over 90 doctors in Australia alone. 

Initally Dr. Pfeiffer  devised the program – called the Pfeiffer treatment – was used mainly for autism in children about 15 years ago. Since Dr. Pfeiffer’s demise –  Dr. Walsh has taken over the research and broadened the field to include not only children but adults –with varying disorders. Dr Walsh’s initial research was based on violent behaviour of prisoners in the US.

Dr. Walsh clearly demonstrates how and why Psychiatry could gain a whole direction – as individualized nutrients will take over from psychiatric medications. These medications he argues “have nagging side effects’ and ‘do not produce normalcy’ of the brain.

Dr. Walsh is president of the Walsh research Institute in US and directs training programs for doctors and physicians in Australia, Norway and many other countries. He has written 200 scientific papers and presented his research to the American Psychiatric Association, the US Senate, the National Institute of Mental Health, and has been a keynote speaker at 28 conferences. 

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General

ADHD-Dr Bill Walsh's research on the subject

ADHD

Did you know that in the US – one in every 31 Americans are either in prison or out on parole or on probation?!? 

Did you also know that not all criminals are from deprived back grounds?

The evidence is mounting – depression schizophrenia and behavioural problems are often chemical imbalances.  After Dr Walsh studied criminals in the Stateville Correctional Centre he questioned the whole nature/nurture argument. He ran literally thousands of experiments, and found that the violent group of prisoners did exhibit trace metal imbalances. His findings showed consistently abnormal levels of zinc, copper, cadmium, magnesium, lithium, chromium, manganese, lead, potassium, etc.

In 1974, Dr Walsh then took eight months to find families where one child was the ‘child from hell’ and the other child close to perfect. He found 24 pairs in the age range of 8 to 18 years old. He then tested both siblings. The samples were coded and blinded to the researchers and the testing laboratory. 

After breaking the code – he found that the well-behaved children had the expected levels of trace metals. Whereas the violent children had abnormal levels of these same trace metals. The badly behaved children tended to have higher levels of lead and cadmium.  Curiously those these children split evenly between high Copper/Zinc(Cu/Zn) ratios and low Cu/Zn ratios. While none of the well behaved children had any imbalance in these ratios. 

Dr Walsh then used a questionnaire to the parents – and found that the high Cu/Zn children reported ‘Jekall and Hyde’ behaviour.  They reported periods of good behaviour interrupted by violent episodes. Most of these children felt remorse after their meltdown. The children of the low Cu/Zn were “oppositional, defiant, cruel to animals and were fascinated by fire”.

In 1976, Dr Walsh then tested 96 extremely violent males from the Chicago area and the 96 non-violent males. The findings from this study not only confirmed the sibling study – they could be used to predict criminal behaviour based on chemistry alone.

That is a brief summary of some of the history of this therapy – a snapshot of the millions of assays Dr Walsh has studied in his quest to solve the mystery of behaviour disorders.

In next week’s blog we will look at some of these findings – ie what chemistries are associated with the different behaviour disorders. 

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ADD & ADHD

Tinnitus and Anxiety

I had the pleasure of meeting  Ilona last week.– she is a pint-sized ball of energy – who in her early 70’s, dances and sings in a theatre group and very involved in a couple of charities – amongst other things. Her story is interesting as it could explain why the Walsh nutrient treatment therapy works on tinnitus.

It happened 12 years ago. Her husband was due for some serious heart surgery – which worried her – and sent her blood pressure up. The day before the operation, the dreaded tinnitus started. Her anxiety levels understandably very high that day. Sadly her husband did not make it through the operation. Ilona’s tinnitus continued for next 12 years. For those who do not have tinnitus – it is a constant ringing in the ears – a constant stress and is ‘enough to drive you mad’. Sometimes it woke her at night – and it is there all day every day.

Ilona never thought she was a particularly anxious person. However her tinnitus continued unabated. She tried acupuncture which helped ‘a little but did not cure’ her. Yoga and Chinese herbs did not do a thing for her. Hypnosis helped during the session, but afterwards the tinnitus came back. Meditation w, over time, it gradually decreased so Ilona learned to live with it. If she was jet-lagged or anxious, the tinnitus got much worse.

As luck would have it, she was hosting a doctor friend, who came to Sydney to be trained at the Walsh Institute Conference. He heard that nutrient therapy could help tinnitus. Desperate she made the appointment to meet one of the Sydney Walsh trained doctors, for which she waited for one month. The doctor measured her blood and urine to establish her individual nutrient levels and prescribed her specific nutrients – one of which is zinc – a common one for anxiety. The results also showed high copper levels along with her low zinc levels.  Ilona takes 8 capsules a day – 4 in the morning, 4 at night.

Nothing much happened for 4 weeks. The next two weeks her symptoms started to decrease. Then suddenly she was symptom free for six whole days in a row. Ilona was so thrilled, she rang Bio Balance – the organisation that puts together these doctor training programs – and sang the praises of this treatment. On the seventh day – the tinnitus came back –at levels much below her original noise level. If her original level was a 10, her new level was 3. This was followed by 15 days, noise free, then it returned for a few days. Ilona feels that the noise-free periods are extending and the days she hears the tinnitus, it is much less bothersome.

When she wakes in the night she hears low level noise until ‘her brain clicks in’ but ‘many days there is nothing and I forget all about it’, said Ilona. If it is there, the level is about 2. Her anxiety about having to live with this for the rest of her life has disappeared.

On her supplements, Ilona has also had much better sleep and has noticed her fingernails are stronger. 

 Ilona can live with a 2 noise level.  She has even offered to talk to others about her experience. If you want to ask her any questions about her tinnitus – you can email her through Bio-Balance blog Post Comments. 

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Help for Post Natal Depression

 

POST NATAL DEPRESSION is something no-one needs to suffer from.

Did you know that Post Natal Depression is easily fixed? And no - it does not need the use of anti-depressants.

When a woman falls pregnant, her body chemistry changes.  Her hormones change – which affects the micro-nutrients in her body. This, in turn, affects her neurotransmitters. Once the neurotransmitters alter, there is a change in how a woman thinks and how she feels. While she is pregnant, these changes occur gradually – over 9 months. The woman has time to adapt to these changes and, in most cases, copes well.

When the baby is born, the woman’s body goes through massive changes - quite suddenly.  Most times there is a ‘day 3 blues day’ – when she cannot stop crying. Her hormones, body chemistry and neurotransmitters take a beating.

At this stage, her copper/zinc levels normally come crashing down to pre-pregnancy levels. Other nutrients are affected – but copper and zinc are the most dominant. After day 3, she is generally back to her old self.

However, for some women, their copper and zinc levels do not come back to pre-pregnancy straight away. Their levels remain elevated longer and drift down gradually. Dr. Walsh found that the majority of post-natally depressed women have the abnormally elevated copper/zinc ratios.

After their levels have been measured, via a simple blood test, they can be brought back into normal range. This simple treatment has cured 97% of women suffering from post-natal depression. (Other essential elements will also need adjusting  - but the main culprits are the copper and zinc elements.)

Let me repeat that.

97% of post-natal depression can be cured

Only doctors trained in the Pfeiffer nutrient therapy know what to look for and how to find the solution.

What is staggering is how simple the remedy is – and how few women know about it. 

Bio-Balance has a list of the doctors trained in this treatment.  Check out their website for more information.

 

 

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