On the Road to Recovery

Christie, left, met with Dr William Walsh and Dr Jenny Draper at the Walsh Research Institute Outreach 2017.

 

Christie never imagined that she would be able to make the seven hour journey from her small town in New South Wales to the Gold Coast for a medical consultation.

Nearly two decades of anxiety, panic, depression and chronic fatigue had taken its toll, with the 42 year-old rarely leaving the safety of her home.

“I have only driven my car a handful of times in the last eight years,” said Christie, after arriving at the Bio-Balance Health Association Outreach in March this year.

 “I am amazed that I am here. I really only leave the house to go to see a doctor.

 “It would be 20 years since I’ve been able to drive out of the perimeter of my town…I find it terrifying.”

However, after recently experiencing improvements to her anxiety through nutrient therapies, she felt empowered to make the journey to meet with Dr William Walsh, an internationally recognised expert on biochemical imbalances.

She had found the Bio-Balance Health website, which led her to a local doctor trained in the Walsh Research Institute treatment protocols.

“I’m constantly reading articles and looking for answers,” said Christie. I read about Dr Walsh and his work, and I thought this sounds like me.”

Her first long drive in many years was not without its challenges, with Cyclone Debbie unleashing her fury across northern New South Wales and Queensland at that time.

“The motorway was closed due to the rain and the floods, so I had to detour through Grafton and Glen Innes along the old highway,” said Christie.

“I left home at 10am on Saturday and arrived on the Gold Coast at 4am on Sunday morning. I drove the whole time, only stopping for something to eat.”

Christie is amazed at her achievement.

“Before I couldn’t have left the house.”

 

Battle with health

Christie has battled allergies and poor health since she was a child, but said her anxiety spiralled out of control when she was a 23 year-old fashion design student in Sydney.

“I’ve always been a bit of a worrier, always nervy and on edge,” she said.

“One morning I was going to University by bus because someone had stolen my car.”

Christie said a family breakup and financial worries were also playing on her mind that day.

“I was running late and decided to have a coffee, then I rushed into class.

“I had an argument with a friend and then all of a sudden I couldn’t breathe, I felt dizzy, like I was spinning….I thought I was going to die.”

She was tested for allergies, and over the following months and years saw many GPs and doctors specialising in environmental and orthomolecular medicine, endocrinology and neurology.

“I still felt extremely agitated and anxious, so I quit my course in Sydney and went back home.

“The first 10 years I tried to go out and see people but I couldn’t enjoy it. Then I just gave up. I lost contact with friends.

“Living with extreme anxiety is hard. You have a buzzing feeling in your chest, you feel dizzy, there is always a sense of doom.”

What followed was a merry-go-round of visits to see psychologists, psychiatrists, counsellors, naturopaths and homeopaths.

“I was diagnosed with Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder in 1998. I spent months gasping for air and all the skin around my mouth turned yellow.”

The same year she was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Systemic Candida and Multiple Chemical Sensitivities.

She was also diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis in 2008 and later developed excruciating headaches and an intolerance to noise.

Over the years she has tried to find relief from her many symptoms through various diets, as well as meditation classes, yoga and massage.

Christie said she has been taking supplements on and off for many years.

“I always knew supplements were important, but I didn’t know if I was taking the right quantities.”

It is early days into her treatment, but she believes the Walsh protocol has had a positive impact on her health.

“I hope that with the help of Dr Walsh and Dr Jenny I will one day be able to work and lead a more normal life in the future,” said Christie.

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Sydney teenager wins 2017 For Art’s Sake Collaborate Art Prize

By Christopher Lo

19 year old Autistic, Anthony Lo has taken the First prize award at this year’s inaugural For Art’s Sake exhibition held by Participate Australia at the Design Centre Enmore, Sydney on Wednesday 28th June. 

For Art’s Sake showcases the creative expression of emerging artists living with disability. Participate Australia encourages their service users to collaborate with practicing artists in the creation of original artworks through one-on-one collaborations and workshops, and to enter these pieces in the Collaborate Art Prize.

Anthony worked with local artist Ro Cook to create “Doughnuts, Donuts”, which was judged by a critically acclaimed panel of artists including Archibald Prize winner Wendy Sharpe, Colin Rhodes, Honorary Professor of Art History and Theory at University of Sydney, David Capra, Sydney based artist whose own work hangs in the National Centre for Creative Learning of the Museum of Contemporary Art and Tamara Armstrong, 2016 Portia Geach Memorial Award winner. 

The Master of Ceremonies for the evening was ABC radio’s James Valentine, who announced Anthony as the winner and said that the judges awarded him this prize based on his artistic merit and because it was “a bold celebratory work-full of joy and exuberance.”

Anthony was surprised and delighted as was his collaborator Ro Cook:

“I love working with Anthony. This is my third year now. He always has a clear vision and knows exactly what he wants to do. He is both bold and fearless.”

Anthony has been drawing and painting constantly since he was little. He has always enjoyed anything tactile, all forms of arts and crafts and enjoys creating new works for himself and others to enjoy.

When asking Anthony what his inspiration was for “Doughnuts, Donuts”, he said:

“I love eating donuts and I love their different icing colours. They make me and everybody feel happy.”

At the end of the evening, the piece was sold as part of the charity auction for $480. When asking the buyer what he loved most about the artwork, Michael Redstone said: “It’s just beautiful to look at, it’s geometrically balanced and the colours are vibrant and cheerful”.

Anthony’s share in the prize money will contribute towards further art classes to develop his skills and interests. When asked what might be his inspiration for next year’s competition, he boldly stated: “hotdogs!”

Tags:

Sydney teenager wins 2017 For Art’s Sake Collaborate Art Prize

By Christopher Lo

19 year old Autistic, Anthony Lo has taken the First prize award at this year’s inaugural For Art’s Sake exhibition held by Participate Australia at the Design Centre Enmore, Sydney on Wednesday 28th June. 

For Art’s Sake showcases the creative expression of emerging artists living with disability. Participate Australia encourages their service users to collaborate with practicing artists in the creation of original artworks through one-on-one collaborations and workshops, and to enter these pieces in the Collaborate Art Prize.

Anthony worked with local artist Ro Cook to create “Doughnuts, Donuts”, which was judged by a critically acclaimed panel of artists including Archibald Prize winner Wendy Sharpe, Colin Rhodes, Honorary Professor of Art History and Theory at University of Sydney, David Capra, Sydney based artist whose own work hangs in the National Centre for Creative Learning of the Museum of Contemporary Art and Tamara Armstrong, 2016 Portia Geach Memorial Award winner. 

The Master of Ceremonies for the evening was ABC radio’s James Valentine, who announced Anthony as the winner and said that the judges awarded him this prize based on his artistic merit and because it was “a bold celebratory work-full of joy and exuberance.”

Anthony was surprised and delighted as was his collaborator Ro Cook:

“I love working with Anthony. This is my third year now. He always has a clear vision and knows exactly what he wants to do. He is both bold and fearless.”

Anthony has been drawing and painting constantly since he was little. He has always enjoyed anything tactile, all forms of arts and crafts and enjoys creating new works for himself and others to enjoy.

When asking Anthony what his inspiration was for “Doughnuts, Donuts”, he said:

“I love eating donuts and I love their different icing colours. They make me and everybody feel happy.”

At the end of the evening, the piece was sold as part of the charity auction for $480. When asking the buyer what he loved most about the artwork, Michael Redstone said: “It’s just beautiful to look at, it’s geometrically balanced and the colours are vibrant and cheerful”.

Anthony’s share in the prize money will contribute towards further art classes to develop his skills and interests. When asked what might be his inspiration for next year’s competition, he boldly stated: “hotdogs!”

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Autism | General

Bio-Balance Health welcomes Doctor Sam

Dr Samarra Toby, husband Massey and son Arty, were excited to meet with US Autism specialist, Dr. Nancy O’Hara, at the Walsh Research Institute Outreach 2017.

Samarra Toby, or Doctor Sam as she is affectionately known by her patients, is a trailblazer in the health industry.

Among the first cohort of medical students at Queensland’s Griffith University, she was the first Aboriginal medical doctor to graduate at the institution in 2008.

Eight years later she was honoured with the School of Medicine Alumni of the Year award, testament to her dedication to holistic medical care and for her tireless advocacy and awareness of those living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

A proud member of the Gangulu people from central Queensland, she has worked for the Federal Government in indigenous health policy, for Queensland Health and as a GP to help improve the health of her people in rural and remote Queensland.

She currently sits on the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ National Membership Advisory Committee, is an active member of the Australian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine and an active Australian Indigenous doctor and mentor.

Her passion and commitment to health and wellness for the last 18 years is reflected in her life and philosophy, including competing in the natural body building and fitness arena, placing in two divisions at the Queensland State Titles in 2016.   

But ask Dr Sam what is her greatest achievement and she quickly answers, “My son Arty”.

“Medicine is certainly up there,” laughs Dr Sam, who dreamt of becoming a doctor as a young girl growing up in Rockhampton.

“But Arty is first.”

And it is her love for seven-year old Arty, who was diagnosed with Autism at four and a half, that led Dr Sam and her husband, Massey to the Bio-Balance Health Association Outreach on the Gold Coast earlier this year.

The family had been prepared to travel to the USA to consult with leading Autism specialists for Arty, but were delighted to discover they could secure a medical assessment for their son with the US doctors at the annual Walsh Research Institute Outreach in Australia.

Dr Sam also undertook the week-long medical program, which delivers training in advanced nutrient therapy methods for mental and behavioural disorders as well as cutting-edge Autism therapies.

She is the first Aboriginal doctor to complete the training program.

Dr Sam said her family and community at home was very supportive of the ideals of the Outreach.

“The indigenous community was very excited that we could be here,” said Dr Sam. 

“It aligns with our traditional approach and philosophy of health, wellness, nature and the environment and intertwines with our cultural beliefs.

“The amazing team and people including the patients that allowed us to join them on their journey to health and wellness, made the learning experience exceptional.”

Dr Sam said the journey the family has unexpectedly embarked on is similar, and yet so different to many other families dealing with a child, or children, diagnosed with ASD.

“As a medical practitioner I had a clinical understanding of what autism could possibly mean for a family, including evidence based therapies that were available and where to seek support and resourcing within Australia.

“However, as a parent and a family our journey has a slightly different perspective that only a family with autism can intimately understand.

“Our son Arty was essentially non-verbal at age four and a half.

“Through the support and guidance of fellow medical colleagues, speech and occupational therapists and early intervention services we have been given the unique and amazing opportunity to travel with our son on his developmental journey.

“The developmental roller coaster that a family may experience with autism is challenging yet beautiful – our son is neurologically gorgeous, creative and highly affectionate.”

Dr Sam and her family came across many resources at the start of their journey, ranging from information about clinical diagnosis and assessment to the multitude of therapies.

However, she felt there was no fantastic all-in-one resource from the perspective of a parent who has been there, and also a health professional who deals in evidence based therapies.

After becoming exceptionally frustrated late one night with resources for her son and having a million flash cards on the floor that interrupted the flow of therapy and learning momentum, she decided to develop a system that was easier to use and transport.

Dr Sam went on to launch The Autism Tool Kit, creating engaging, useful, hands on therapy resources and tools.

She undertook the photography, editing and graphic design herself consulting with educational experts and therapists to create easy to use resources and instructions.

Finding it difficult to get to the shops to buy resources, she decided to make The Autism Tool Kit available online, and has since shared the system with many other families living with autism.

“The development of these resources and their use have been for our son, and due to overwhelming support and feedback it was suggested we perhaps make these available for other families who may find themselves in a similar position,” said Dr Sam.

“It became my mission to help make ASD resources more affordable and share what I’ve learned on my own journey with Arty.”

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Mental Health – science-based therapies come to Melbourne

The successful Walsh Research Institute Outreach, which has helped hundreds of Australian patients challenged by mental illness for the past 14 years, will be held in Melbourne for the first time in 2018.

The Outreach, Conference and Training Program for Medical Doctors will be presented by Bio-Balance Health at the Rendezvous Hotel in Melbourne from 17th-23rd March.

“Bio-Balance Health is very excited to report that we are taking our Doctor Training and Conference on the road in 2018 – all the way to Melbourne,” said Bio-Balance Health Association President Judy Nicol.

“We have received so many requests from the Victorian doctors and patients for us to come to Melbourne over the years, and since we had spent 9 years in Sydney, followed by 5 years on the Gold Coast, we did think it was time for us to come to Melbourne.

“We look forward to receiving help to spread the word about our time in Melbourne from the 17-23rd March next year from all our supporters in Victoria, and to seeing many new doctors attend to learn about this exciting new field of Nutritional Psychiatry.”

Since 2004, over 1,200 patients have attended specialised Australian clinics to access treatment for Depression, Behavioural Disorders, Anxiety, Schizophrenia, ADHD, Bipolar Disorder and Autism.

Medical practitioners trained in Walsh Research Institute assessment and treatment techniques prescribe vitamins, minerals, amino acids and fatty acids based on each patient’s unique body chemistry.

According to an article in the UK medical journal The Lancet (January 2015), now is the time for the recognition of the importance of nutrition and nutrient supplementation in psychiatry.

“Although the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a crucial factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that diet is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology, and gastroenterology. Evidence is steadily growing for the relation between dietary quality (and potential nutritional deficiencies) and mental health, and for the select use of nutrient-based supplements to address deficiencies, or as monotherapies or augmentation therapies.”

The article by members of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research provides the growing evidence of addressing nutrient deficiencies to preserve mental health.

An internationally recognized expert on biochemical imbalances, Dr. William Walsh PhD has devoted nearly 40 years to researching the biochemistry behind behaviour, learning and memory, mental health and various disease conditions.

His approach recognizes that nutrient imbalances can alter brain levels of key neurotransmitters, disrupt gene expression of proteins and enzymes and cripple the body’s protection against environmental toxins.

“Advanced nutrient therapy offers an alternative treatment approach, which represents a natural method of correcting imbalances in neurotransmitter activity,” said Dr. Walsh.

“The clinical challenge is to determine the biochemistry of each patient and to develop an individualized treatment plan aimed at normalizing brain chemistry.”

The president of the non-profit Walsh Research Institute near Chicago directs physician and practitioner training programs internationally, including in Australia, England, Ireland, Norway and USA.

The program has expanded each year in Australia with 230 doctors trained by 2017, the majority from Australia, but also from New Zealand, South East Asia, Hong Kong, Ireland and the UK.

The internationally acclaimed US consultants attending the 2018 Outreach will include Drs. William Walsh, PhD, Elizabeth Mumper, MD, FAAP, Albert Mensah, MD, Judith Bowman, MD and for her second year, Nancy O’Hara, MD, a board certified pediatrician with a practice dedicated to the integrative and holistic care of children with neurodevelopment disorders.

The medical doctor training program, providing the opportunity to participate with word-class experts in the evaluation of patients, has attracted interest from as far away as Japan, India, Ireland, Singapore and New Zealand.

The Outreach was held in Sydney for eight years between 2005 and 2012, before relocating to the Gold Coast in 2013.

“The development of the Australian Outreach Clinics in Sydney and the Gold Coast has made a significant contribution to the quality of life for hundreds of mentally ill people in Australia,” said Dr. Walsh.

“Most patients report this treatment has resulted in significantly-improved mental functioning and a marked reduction in medication levels required, giving a substantial reduction, if not elimination, of common side effects.

“A survey conducted by one of our trained Australian doctors showed that on average, 85% of the patients responded to the treatment, with a significant number of patients showing remarkable gains.”

Registration is currently open for the Patient Assessment Program with participants encouraged to take advantage of the Early Bird Concession fees, a saving of $150 if paid before 31st October, 2017.

It is advised to book early as patients will need to undertake a series of special blood, urine and hair analysis tests at least four weeks prior to the Outreach consultation.

The Outreach will include a One Day Public Conference on Sunday, 18th March 2018 with both professionals and the public invited to hear from visiting experts on the latest research in the areas of mental health and autistic spectrum disorders.

Conference guest speakers in 2018 will include Dr Denise Furness, a Molecular Geneticist and Nutritionist and Dr. Stephanie Fryar-Williams, a Psychiatrist/Researcher who will give a presentation on the Biomarkers for Schizophrenia.

Physicians wanting to take part in the Outreach training program and families interested in the evaluation of a loved one should contact:

Marnie Lo on 02 8789 0451; Email: marnie@biobalance.org.au

For other enquiries: Bio-Balance 07 56796675

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General | Outreach | Outreach Conference

From the President - August 2017

Bio-Balance Health is very excited to report that we are taking our Doctor Training and Conference on the road in 2018 – all the way to Melbourne. 

We have received so many requests from the Victorian doctors and patients for us to come to Melbourne over the years, and since we had spent 9 years in Sydney, followed by 5 years on the Gold Coast, we did think it was time for us to come to Melbourne.

It is amazing to us all, that in 2004, we began by training one doctor, who saw 18 patients and that by 2017, we have trained 230 doctors, mostly from Australia, but some from New Zealand, South East Asia, Hong Kong, and one Irish and one UK doctor.  

What is also very exciting is that now a number of our doctors have begun research projects – one of whom published a paper in 2016, which according to Research Journal Altometrics.com was considered internationally, one of the five most influential papers for 2016 for Biomarker Research.   This ground breaking research is putting Australia in the forefront of validating Advanced Nutrient therapy.    She is about to begin the next expensive stage of her project and will be reporting on it to our Doctors at the 2018 training in Melbourne.    Another of our doctors is looking into research into Alzheimer’s and is awaiting Ethics approval.  All this, plus the work Bill Walsh is doing in the USA –plus our QUT study with Bill, is now much closer, after many unfortunate delays. 

We look forward to receiving help to spread the word about our time in Melbourne from the 17-23rd March next year from all our supporters in Melbourne, and to seeing many new doctors attend to learn about this exciting new field of Nutritional Psychiatry.   Since our Conference will have some of the top speakers in their field speaking for the first time in Melbourne, we expect that we will have a great attendance on Sunday 18th March. 

Please save the date and we are all looking forward to meeting you there. 

Judy Nicol 

President. 

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General

Dr. Walsh Presented at Tokyo Seminar

In April 2016, Dr. Walsh traveled to Tokyo, Japan, to educate 75 physicians during an all-day seminar entitled "Methylation and Epigenetics for Psychiatric Disorders".  Dr. Walsh's six presentations were carefully translated in Japanese for attendees to learn about the role of methylation and epigenetics in autism, ADHD, behavioral disorders, anxiety, depression (including postpartum), bipolar, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.  

The program was coordinated by molecular physician Dr. Kenji Miyzawa, founder of the Japanese Society of Orthomolecular Medicine.  

Over the next six months, Dr. Walsh's book Nutrient Power will be available in six languages, including Japanese.

Left: Slide of "Methylation and Epigenetics for Psychiatric Disorders" during Dr. Walsh's presentation

Right: Hana Takano, Dr. Walsh and Dr. Miyazawa (Sola City Conference Center, Tokyo, Japan)

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Practitioners

Dr. Walsh's Commentary on Johns Hopkins Study Excessive Folate Levels in Pregnant Women

 

Undermethylated mothers appear more likely to bear children with spinal bifida, autism, and certain other conditions than most other mothers.  Research clearly shows that folate supplements for the mother can lessen the incidence of these disorders.  Folates have critical roles in cell division and epigenetic gene regulation for the growing fetus.  To protect the baby, most prenatal vitamins contain robust amounts of folates.  

A complication is that many undermethylated women suffer from clinical depression associated with low serotonin neurotransmission, and folates tend to worsen this condition by an epigenetic mechanism.  For these women, we recommend supplements of methionine or SAMe that act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors be taken together with the folates.

Days 16-24 of gestation represent a critical period of in-utero development, and many mothers are unaware of pregnancy at that time.  Ideally, folates and other supplements should be started a few months before potential or expected pregnancies.

It's clear that methylation status and folate availability are critical factors during in-utero development of a fetus.  The ideal would be for mothers to achieve "normal" or proper levels of methyl and folate availability before and during pregnancy.  Although folate supplements can reduce the incidence of spinal bifida and certain other birth defects, we believe that excessive folate dosages or an overmethylation condition would likely result in altered epigenetic DNA regulation and a different set of birth defects.  We recommend that mothers anticipating having a child be tested for folate and methylation status by an experienced physician to normalize biochemistry before pregnancy.  In my clinical experience I've learned that genetic or acquired nutrient overloads usually cause more mischief than deficiencies. - William J. Walsh, PhD, FACN

This article appeared in the Walsh Research Institute June 2016 e-newsletter.

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Health

Collaborative effort has schizophrenia in its sights

The complexity of schizophrenia has long been a barrier to understanding the disorder, with no definitive understanding of triggers, underlying biology or its unrelenting persistence after onset. Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI) researcher Dr Joanne Voisey is collaborating with US peers to gain a better understanding.

Extensive international study into schizophrenia has so far led to plausible explanations but not necessarily in-depth understanding. Researchers around the world agree that schizophrenia involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. They believe the emerging research field of epigenetics is best placed to provide explanations of the disorder.

Epigenetics refers to changes in gene expression, or the distinction between active and inactive genes, that does not involve changes to the underlying DNA. 

An example of a mechanism that causes these changes is DNA methylation. Dr Voisey says methylation profiling enables the measurement of the activity of thousands of genes at once. “The methylation profiles allow us to determine differences seen between schizophrenia patients with particular symptom severity and their response to medication,” she says. 

Dr Voisey is leading IHBI’s collaboration with the Walsh Research Institute in Illinois in the US, using a prestigious Hilton Family Foundation Inc grant of $165 838. An aim of the research is to provide evidence that schizophrenia is a gene-regulation disorder. Such a disorder is characterised by an abnormality or impairment in regulatory mechanisms that govern metabolism, immune response or organ function.

“Our objective is to identify specific genes that are dysregulated, so we can target them with improved treatments,” Dr Voisey says. “We also aim to use epigenetics to eventually enable identification of people at risk of developing schizophrenia and provide strategies for effective prevention.”

Beyond investigating epigenetic avenues, the collaboration will study environmental factors that can cause altered gene expression.

“Researchers are developing effective methods for identifying cancer-prevention genes that have been ‘turned off’ by environmental factors. Our study aims to determine if a similar approach will work in schizophrenia.”

It is probable that some people are born with a predisposition to developing schizophrenia and that certain factors, including stress or use of drugs such as marijuana, LSD or speed, can trigger their first episode. 

Dr Voisey says a key element missing in most research is recognition that schizophrenia may be an ‘umbrella’ term used to describe several different disorders. The Walsh Research Institute has identified three major schizophrenia biotypes based on their database of 3600 diagnosed patients.

“Our study is expected to provide sharper, more definitive evidence that schizophrenia is epigenetic in nature, validate the classification of schizophrenia into biotypes and identify specific gene-regulation abnormalities for each biotype,” she says.

The ultimate aim is to understand triggers; develop tools for identifying at-risk people and providing early diagnosis; and introduce effective prevention and treatment strategies based on the specific schizophrenia biotypes.

“I am excited to be working with the Walsh Research Institute as we have a common goal of discovering better diagnoses and treatment options for patients,” Dr Voisey says. 

“It is such a debilitating disorder and antipsychotic treatments don’t target individual symptoms. Side effects can be just as negative as some of the schizophrenia symptoms. By identifying DNA methylation patterns we are targeting both environmental and genetic risk factors which may uncover more of the schizophrenia puzzle.”

SCHIZOPHRENIA

A medical condition affecting the normal functioning of the brain, interfering with a person’s ability to think, feel and act. People with schizophrenia have one personality. It is a myth that those affected have a split personality.

SYMPTOMS

Outside of treatment, people with schizophrenia experience persistent symptoms of what is called psychosis. These include:

  • Confused thinking: The everyday thoughts that let us live our daily lives become confused and don’t join up properly.
  • Delusions: Holding a belief that is not held by others of the same cultural background.
  • Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling or tasting something that is not actually there. Often disembodied voices that no one else can hear.
  • Associated symptoms: Low motivation and changed feelings.

TREATMENT

  • Can reduce and even eliminate the symptoms, generally including a combination of medication and community support. Both are usually essential for the best outcome.
  • Medication: Can assist the brain to restore its usual chemical balance.
  • Community support: Should include information, accommodation, help with finding suitable work, training and education, psychosocial rehabilitation and mutual support groups. Understanding and acceptance is very important.

This article was published in the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI) newsletter June 2016, edition 26.

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Schizophrenia

From the President - August 2016

Our 2016 Outreach and Conference has finished, our American faculty have gone home, and all our 70 doctors who attended the training have gone back to their respective clinics and the 30 new doctors have begun using some of the protocols they were taught. A larger number of doctors than usual are asking questions of their peers through the special doctors website, which has become quite active as the doctors share their knowledge. All doctors are welcome to register to be able to receive ongoing help from this site and we encourage it. We now have a technical team who will attend every Outreach to assist doctors in this regard.

This year we had some international doctors from London, the USA, NewZealand and Hong Kong as well as our first Northern Territory doctor, so we now have every state in Australia covered.  Some of these doctors have already said they will be returning in 2017, so we will look forward again to welcome many of our previous participants as we do every year. 

We are also thrilled to welcome more and more psychiatrists each year.  The Walsh Research Institute in their training programme in October this year at this stage have 50% psychiatrists in their intake.  We would love to increase our intake for 2017.as well. Bill Walsh had been asked to lecture in Japan and Switzerland in March and June this year with the result there have been Japanese and Swiss doctors registering for training in the USA and we have been told some are thinking of coming to Australia in March, so we look forward to welcoming them, and sharing their experiences with our Australian doctors.

We received a request from the Japanese team to translate some of our website into Japanese, and the book “Nutrient Power” by Bill Walsh will soon be translated into 6 languages, Indonesian, Chinese, German with the Japanese and Portuguese version out in the next couple of months.

Our Menzies Research Project (Griffith University) project on Violent and Aggressive children is being written up and by the end of the year will be looking for a publisher, and our QUT project on Schizophrenia is moving ahead slowly,(see further details in the newsletter) as well as our own special researcher Dr Stephanie Fryar-Williams is continuing on with her research.

Our Conference was a big success again with all the exhibition stands occupied and over 300 people present. We received a number of compliments on the quality of the lecturers especially because we try to treat the audience as very knowledgeable, as many are, because of the research many have done for their own children.

We look forward to a very successful Outreach and Conference again in 2017.

Tags:

General | Outreach